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The reality of new years resolutions

by Melody Azimi, Staff Writer

Photo by: Lilly Quaid

At the start of every new year, people decide that they want to better themselves by, for example, losing weight, getting better grades, or even sticking to a sport or a hobby. They enter the new year with the motto of, “New year, new me.” Though, by just a few months of trying to keep up with their resolutions, most people can’t find the time or the energy to do so and eventually give up. Statistic Brain says that only 8 percent of people who make a new year’s resolution actually achieve them.

The problem with making a new year’s resolutions is that people make ones that don’t fit their schedule or that may be too hard to fully commit to. According to Marist Poll, the most popular new year’s resolution is to workout everyday or become healthier by losing weight, making up 23 percent of people’s resolutions. But because of school, work schedules, and other priorities, people are short of time to actually do such resolutions.

“Like I do every year, I made another new year’s resolution. But because of my busy schedule, I wasn’t able to keep up with it so I gave up,” said Tori Cooper, junior.

A solution is to make a more realistic and achievable goal. One way of doing this is by telling one’s self that they want this coming year to be the year of their best, healthiest body; not to necessarily lose weight but to achieve the best body they can.

New year’s resolutions shouldn’t be stressful and tiring. They should be enjoyable. By making it a goal rather than a task, the aspect of a resolution changes. One will actually be happy to get up and finish their resolution rather than become lazy telling themselves day after day the same excuse of, “I will start tomorrow.”