What’s the point of Black Friday?

By Yechan Kwon, Staff Writer

Black Friday, the day where people trample and crowd each other for cheap goods mere hours after being “thankful” for what they already have. It feels almost ironic if you think about it. Thanksgiving is supposed to be a day of being together and being content.

Most people are there to save money by buying things at a discount. However, since everyone is there for the same reason, it tends to get a bit chaotic. It’s not worth rummaging through the massive swarm that materializes in stores just for a discount on cheap goods if you already have what you need because in the end, how much extra are you really going to get? Most of what you want to get is probably something that you don’t really need or is all sold out by the time you already arrive there. Sometimes you lose from going, instead of gaining cheap goods.

It is also quite tiresome on the store clerks who have to deal with that many customers. It’s pretty stressful on both ends, if you think of it. No one wants to deal with that many people at once right after most likely having the day off. With everyone running back and forth the aisles and the cash register, it would make for quite the tiring day.

Overall, Black Friday shouldn’t be this huge mess of people trying to hoard an entire store’s stock of objects. They should remember what they and their family said hours before on Thanksgiving Day. It doesn’t have to be chaotic; people can choose to be more calm with the whole ordeal and be a bit more mindful. We have long lines stretching from store doors on Thanksgiving evening. That’s where it gets a bit excessive.

As Jacqueline Grohs, an English teacher at Leigh, says, “On one hand I like deals like anyone does but on the other hand, it shouldn’t get to where people forget their humanity and it becomes violent.”

Instead of celebrating thankfulness and being content with family and friends, short-sighted people are just impatient standing outside of stores waiting for opening the next day so that they can all rush to hoard what they don’t need at all.

In order for Black Friday to be a more contained, less chaotic event, what we could all do as people is simply not forget our humanity and be more caring because as much as we like these great deals, so do others and the season of giving has begun.

We should also keep in mind what we really need and what we already have. Sure like $60 for a television sounds enticing but if you already have one that works, consider giving it to someone who might not have one. You also really don’t need another video game console if you know it won’t be popular after a while so unless you plan to give it as a gift, don’t just rush over to it.

We should also remember that everyone else is a person too with the same goals and try to be more respectful. If we do this, perhaps this day could be a more enjoyable and calm event.